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The addictiveness of unboxing videos

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A box is opened, its content taken out, shown to the cameras from every angle and a voice takes you through their first impressions. A simple but surprisingly popular format that helps you understand what it might feel like to own a certain product. From smartphones to vacuum cleaners, computers to toys, beauty products to lawn mowers, if you can buy it, there’s probably an unboxing video for it.

Unboxing videos work on multiple layers where on one hand, this format has been seen as a functional way for consumers to cut through all the marketing clutter they are subjected to and find out exactly what the product might be like. Is it worth the hype? Does it look the same as the ad? What might it look like in my hand? Anything to get a sense of its worth and value through another person’s eyes without any of the gloss that comes along with an advertisement.

On the other hand, unboxing videos play up to a deeper emotional layer that allows watchers to revel in the joy of watching something being unwrapped. Psychologists have noted that shopping is the modern-day equivalent to hunting, and unwrapping is a way of reliving the ‘kill’ and take pleasure in what we have captured. There is an undeniable pleasure in ripping off the packaging of a new product, peeling off its plastic and holding something unused in your hands. Apparently, it works just as well watching someone else do it. This is a throwback to the strangely hypnotic shopping infomercials on TV that were so easy to zone out with, watching hundreds of products be examined in a detailed and relaxed setting.

According to a Google study in 2014, the appeal of unboxing videos lies in the sense of anticipation within them, regardless of what’s being unpackaged. Most viewers would not intend to make the purchase, or even want to own the product that’s being shown. Our willingness to watch someone else unwrap products seems to scratch a subconscious itch.  Essentially aspirational, unboxing videos are a way to satiate consumers who want something they can’t buy yet but are able to share in a fantasy and soak in the raw pleasure of opening a new product. Note – ‘fueling aspiration’ is a key part of successful marketing strategies.

Kids especially seem to love unboxing videos the most, as they get to experience the joy of opening a toy themselves. This format of videos has all the elements that kids enjoy, the surprise of what’s inside paired with being able to see their favorite toys. So popular that it sparked a ‘moral panic’ in the US, with multiple parents lodging complaints and calling for greater regulation. Unboxing videos are seen to blur the line between online content and advertising, teaching children to be materialistic at a very young age and contributing to their growing tech addiction. The greatest hook is that children like to watch things that are made by children for children and the internet has given this common phenomenon a global platform with a seemingly unlimited supply.

It is telling that the most popular genre of unboxing videos are toys taking 9 out of the top 10 unboxing videos on YouTube, with the most watched video racking up 321 million views over the last 4 years. Other popular unboxings are of gadgets like the iPhone, the Xbox and PlayStation. This global demand for unboxing videos even has brands jumping in and competing for views with their own official Unboxing videos trying to craft their brand narrative.

Consumerism is addictive and unboxing videos have a way of fueling the latent desire for new products that lives within all of us, conveying that it’s ‘things’ that make us happy. On the other hand perhaps, unboxing videos give us that space to stop and consider our purchases in detail before clicking through to buy, allowing to have someone who is ‘just like us’ go through the process instead. As noted by Professor Marsh in the UK, “Unboxing videos speak to very human interests, our interest in goods, in surprises and of course in other human beings”

Here are some of the top unboxing channels on YouTube for your viewing pleasure:

  1. Ryan ToysReview – 18 million subscribers

  2. Unbox Therapy– 13 million subscribers

  3. CKN Toys – 11 million subscribers

  4. Eleventh Gorgeous – 1.7 million subscribers

  5. Dope or Nope – 6.3 million followers

 

The World of Virtual Influencers

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Avatar cultures have been around for years but it’s only in recent times that they have been gaining mainstream attention on social media. Virtual Influencers, cyber models, CGI models, AI accounts or even Brandfluentars (yes you read that right), no matter what you might call them, globally the industry has a potential to reach a value of up to $10 billion by 2020.  The number of names that we have for them is a clear indicator of how confused the world is by their existence.

These models might not have a physical form but that is not easy to understand in the world of social media. Each with their own distinctive personalities and identifying with real racial, social or gender groups, the advances of CGI it is very tough to spot them online without a closer examination. While you might scoff at the idea of virtual influencers being popular, take a look at Lil Miquela, one of the first on the scene is an online star today with over 1.5 million followers on Instagram and Brud, the company that created her valued at $125 million.

Their popularity has not gone unnoticed by brands of the world with the fashion and beauty categories being amongst the first to experiment with virtual influencers. Prada, Chanel, Burberry, Diesel, Moschino, Supreme and Balmain to name a few looked to ride the spike in interest in this new age form of influence. Fashion brands have been able to make the most of the PR exposure that was a result of this unusual choice of models. These virtual influencers have done everything from sporting the brands clothing to appearing with real-world celebrities and even appearing as a hologram within live events.

Balmain campaign
Margot, Shudu and Zhi modeling for Balmain

For brands, virtual influencers have been seen as a natural evolution of the digital world after being burned a number of times over the last couple of years with adverse publicity that has engulfed the influencer economy (artificially inflated follower numbers and volatile personalities). While brands have tried to implement processes that minimize such risks (careful vetting of influencers and rigid terms of conduct contracts), some marketers have decided to jump ship and work with influencers that are made of pixels and are much easier to control. No more coaxing humans to pose a certain way or say a certain thing, virtual influencers hold the potential of complete creative freedom.

If you think about it, human influencers have an expiry date, but virtual IP can be extended infinitely. The newest kind of content system for the influence economy, as after all does it matter if an influencer is fake if they have the same ‘influence’ as someone who is real?

One of the concerns that might leap to mind is the value of authenticity, now that consumers know that the ‘person’ they are being exposed to isn’t real but a digital creation.

Mobbie Nazir, Chief Strategy Officer at We Are Social points out “Many consumers are fed up with overly-contrived social media posts that purport to showcase ‘real’ life, and may prefer unashamed artificiality. This gives brands the opportunity to be openly fake – indeed, owning it and coming across all the more real for it”.

Akin to the world of videogames brands using virtual influencers can benefit from coming across as ‘meta’, sharing that ‘knowing’ bond with its customers of this virtual reality, allowing themselves to suspend their disbelief and play along with the antics of these characters.

From a consumer standpoint, it also helps that we are becoming more and more used to and dependent on technology in the context of everyday life. From digital assistants like Siri and Alexa to chatbots online we are increasingly accustomed to interacting with fictional characters and more importantly being influenced by them.

While Virtual Influencers are seen as a shiny new toy it is by no means a magic bullet and comes along with its own concerns. Foremost, they might not work across all industries, being more receptive in the fashion world rather than healthcare where the same influence might not translate. The other major concern is if human models now have to compete with perfectly animated avatars, there is a huge risk to the ‘self-esteem’ of the human race.

International fashion photographer Manny Roman noted, “While I do admire digital art, I don’t like the non-realistic message that is being sent out to society, I fear the CGI models image will escalate the body and image dysmorphic epidemic”.

Another concern (that we can thank Elon Musk for) is the potential power of AI and what impact that could have on society as a whole. Will AI evolve to a stage that the influence on human-kind is decided and determined by technology and algorithms  (On second thought, it seems like that’s already here). The important point to note is being able to distinguish the lines between technology and reality and acknowledging the mental effects the blurring of those lines might have (As seen in video game addiction in young children).

The future of virtual influencers could range from real models being scanned and working simultaneously across multiple locations in the world to reality TV shows that star hyper-realistic virtual characters, essentially anything could be possible. Ultimately there are still many questions unanswered and many avenues still to be explored in this category that makes it hard to gauge whether it is a positive step for the future of a negative one. But it is clear from the traction it has had so far that virtual influencers have proven themselves worthy of a seat at the table alongside their real-life counterparts.

The curious case of slow TV

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In a world where people dash around crowded cities, slow TV is an oasis for the minds of the modern world. Essentially a reverse of the instant gratification of reality TV and 24-hour news shows, it focuses on a singular topic and explores it in real time.

Slow TV has its roots in an experimental film by Andy Warhol in 1963 where he captured a poet sleeping for more than 5 hours. It was reignited by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation in 2009 with a seven-hour Norwegian programme ‘Bergensbanen’ – a minute by minute video capture of a train journey across Southern Norway. An average of 20% of the country’s population tuned in for the show which led to further films being commissioned. The next landmark film was ‘Hurtigruten minute by minute’ – a coastal voyage from Bergen to Kirkenes which was 137 hours long (A Guinness record for length of film) with more than half the country tuning in, making it a remarkable success with international fanfare and adoption.

Over the last decade, creators have explored everything from watching a log burn for Christmas, floating down canals, train journeys, following the reindeer migration, knitting and even watching sheep graze peacefully. The concept recently made an appearance in New Zealand with ‘Go South’ a Prime TV programme taking viewers on a 12-hour journey from Auckland to Milford Sound.

The slow TV concept works because of its sheer contrast to our busy lives, it’s a chance to slow down and immerse in something that few other kinds of modern entertainment allow. A sensory escape of sorts, watching things as they unfold in their own time is strangely absorbing and relaxing. Whether you are watching a landscape unfold or starting at a log burn, the constant subtle rhythmic changes of slow TV is hypnotic with its strangely simplistic boldness. Some viewers have noted that it’s similar to walking in a forest or going for a hike, an opportunity to break from one’s routine and calm the mind.

Slow TV might be the way for us to pull ourselves back from overstimulation, accessing a relaxed sensory state that’s harder to come by when we are increasingly surrounded by modern tools that keep our minds in a semi-permanent overdrive. Having a continuous video capture with all the boring and interesting parts mashed together, the viewers become the editors of sorts allowing them to decide what’s boring and what’s exciting.  It’s the lack of character-driven plots and narration that opens up the space for interpretation and opinion by the audience.

A 2018 study by Deloitte that found that 91% of us are multi-tasking while watching TV (up from 79% in 2014), which essentially means we are only passively consuming what we turned on the TV to watch. Herein lies the real beauty of slow TV, its ability to cater to both passive and active consumption; working on two levels – as a beautiful view in your living room (think of it as an evolved version of Apple TV screen savers), or if you pay it some attention it could lead you on a stimulating journey.

As the world constantly looks for ways to make things bigger, stronger, louder and faster, the crawling speed of slow TV seems to be an antidote to the modern madness. A way to help us achieve a natural state of restoration and rediscover the joy of living in the moment.

15 Big Themes For The 2019 NZ Marketing Whiteboard

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  1. We really do need to save the planet now – with genuine alternatives like electric vehicles and without old habits like single-use plastic.
  2. Digital transformation marches on– but in many organisations, it can be a bumpy journey with conceptual disconnects and slow-to-adapt people and systems
  3. Mainstreaming of technology building blocks – marketing automation, AI, bots, voice assistants, VR/AR…
  4. A newly minted government – it used to be ‘justify why you need to spend’, and now it is more a case of ‘what are you investing in to do the job?’
  5. Big tactics, skinny strategy – lots of short-term initiatives in the marketplace, with less attention to long-term strategy (I recommend you read ‘Why aren’t we doing this? care of the Commercial Communications Council)
  6. Swelling in-house teams– with DIY e-commerce, marketing automation, social media and design. But as with home DIY it does vary in quality.
  7. The digital deluge – if you thought traditional media advertising created discontent, the digital world has taken interruption to a new high/low.
  8. Losing Facebook – the giant has slipped in terms of trust and confidence, with young people especially departing in large numbers.
  9. Influencers are the names with the numbers – social media stars with lots of followers are becoming go-to media options.
  10. Shopping events – Black Friday is now a bigger shopping event than Boxing Day and Singles’ Day is the world’s biggest at USD 30 billion.
  11. Authenticity – the antidote to fake news and marketing hyperbole and a must-have for Gen Z. Reviews have replaced ads as the selection driver in many categories.
  12. Personalisation – tools like marketing automation and AI are enabling the next level of direct marketing.
  13. Privacy – the flipside of personalisation -an increasing issue for modern marketing practices.
  14. New ways to pay – we’re seeing a rash of new payment platforms emerging, most of them channelled through our mobiles.
  15. Gen Z – move over Millennials, there are new kids entering the workforce.

What others would you add?

Visit headlight.co.nz

 

The 3 biggest problems with in-house agencies

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The rise of in-house agencies is certainly one of the biggest changes within the marketing world over the past few years.  In-house teams are brought together usually to run digital marketing programmes, or design work, or social media.
The business case for an in-house agency is typically a mix of:
  • Focus & attention – no agency can know or care as much as we do about our business.
  • Greater agility – being always on they make businesses more responsive.
  • Managing the digital engine – having the core drivers of direct e-commerce owned and managed in-house.
  • Cost savings – shedding the cost of external agencies in favour of internal teams.
  • Because others are doing it – in-house teams are in vogue and seen as the modern way to go.
There are many companies that operate a mixed model of some in-house, supplemented by external specialists.
While some in-house agencies operate very effectively, there are some problems that are all too common.
Three big ones are:
  1. Ready, fire, aim
    This is when companies are looking for short-term wins, but end up delivering short-term whims that lack strategic purpose or cohesion. Having the means of production at hand can make it too tempting to execute before thinking it through.
    The risk is inconsistency, a lack of relevance, confusion and a dilution of brand strength.
  2. Cars with no petrol
    This is when the creation of in-house capability is a mask for reducing the marketing budget. It can become an excuse for minimising marketing effort.
    The risk is an erosion of brand health through underinvestment.
  3. Drinking our own Kool-Aid
    This is when companies limit their activity to only what they do in-house. An internal focus without debate and the stretch of strategic and creative interpretation can lead to companies limiting the scope and quality of what they do.
    The risk is weak marketing and communications, resulting from limited strategic, creative or technical crafting.
Headlight works with a number of in-house teams, providing expert strategic direction, problem solving and insights to help clients get the best from their marketing investment.
Please get in touch for a chat if you need help with your in-house team.

Why people hate ads – especially digital ones

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A good read from Vieo…

Advertising is only getting more pervasive, obnoxious, and intrusive. That’s not my personal opinion (though I absolutely agree); that’s the internet speaking.

According to recent consumer surveys, digital advertising doesn’t exactly have the best rep. Pop-ups interrupt the browsing experience at every turn. Creepy remarketing stalks you with the same display ad everywhere you go. Autoplaying videos embarrass you in waiting rooms and on buses. You can hardly read a news article without having to scroll past a dozen ads and accidentally clicking on one of them.

Read more here…

‘Millennials’: just a buzzword?

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The Millennial generation as defined by Pew Research is anyone born between the years 1981 and 1996. In 2018, this includes everyone age 21 to 37 (That’s about the age gap between Kylie Jenner and Kim Jong-Un) this extends from people just entering the workspace to ‘adults’ with 2 kids or more.
The much-hyped label ‘Millennials’ has resulted in a blanket buzzword that is often met with derision. It brings up an image of Snapchat-happy narcissists who hate hard work and criticism but love ethical products and spending all their money on avocado toast.
Apparently, millennials are killing countless industries, here are a few from a seemingly never-ending list.
  1. Napkins
  2. Cereal
  3. Golf
  4. Motorcycles
  5. Yoghurt ( especially light yoghurt)
  6. Homeownership
  7. Diamonds
  8. Soap bars
  9. Banks
For a more detailed read and more industries that have apparently been brought to their knees, read more here. Some of the other more bizarre accusations range from being afraid of doorbells, bringing about the end of churchgoing, giving up on dinner dates and loving wine but not the process of uncorking it.
In the marketing sense, it is illogical to assume that a 21-year-old and a 37-year-old consume the same media, have similar life interests or even react to the same stimulus. Understandable that “a generational name helps to start a conversation,” according to Jason Dorsey, president and lead researcher of millennials at the Centre for Generational Kinetics, a research firm that studies millennials and Generation Z. “Otherwise, we might be saying ‘twentysomething’ and ‘thirtysomething,’ which is not actually generation-specific but a demographic.
The Wall Street Journal has admitted that the term ‘Millennials’ has become a sort of snide shorthand in their reporting, Fortune has suggested dropping the title, millennials themselves hate being clubbed together and research too has shown that most resist the label.
Author and journalist, Summer Brennan, came up with an interesting idea aimed at getting people to accurately understand the term ‘millennial’. Every time you see a headline that mentions ‘millennials’, replace it with ‘adults under 40’.
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If you do that for the examples stated above, ‘adults under 40′ killed the napkin/cereal/yogurt/diamond industry; ‘adults under 40’ are afraid of doorbells does sound a little absurd. It does help to take a deep breath and objectively take buzzwords out to get a real understanding. This all comes down to the way we frame conversation shapes our worldview. Specific words and phrases have the power to change minds.
A famous quote from Winston Churchill (originally describing Israel) seems to sum up the generation pretty well “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma”.
On the other end of the spectrum, one of  Deloitte’s startling revelations was that media consumption behaviours of Gen  Z,  Millennials,  and  Gen X are now so similar, they nicknamed this combined group the “MilleXZials.” But that definitely needs a blog post in itself and a revamp of the way we compartmentalize and understand the world.

What’s up with Gen Z?

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Gen Z has grown up in a world full of distrustful government leaders, increased awareness of privacy issues and generations laden with debt. This has only made them distrustful of authority and big brands. Thanks to their Gen X parents, they are more realistic that opportunities are not boundless (unlike Millennials) and that they need to continue to master new skills to stay relevant. Below are a few Gen Z insights to keep top of mind to get a grasp of what this generation is all about.
Quick Facts:
  • Gen Z is categorised as people born between 1996 and 2011
  • Material-related desires, such as driving a nice car, have become less important with having fun, travelling, creating deep connections and having a more meaningful life rising in importance to Gen Z
  • Have an 8-second attention span
  • Gen Z spend up to 11 hours per day on social media
  • More money conscious than Millennials
Hard work pays:
A stark difference from Millennials, this is a generation that is hardworking and does not expect to be lavished with praise and rewards at the smallest drop of a hat. Brands need to find a way to help them further their professional and personal lives. They have seen that millennials expect to be given things and realized that hasn’t always happened, so they feel a real responsibility to work hard and achieve goals for themselves.
Authenticity is key:
Growing up in a digital age, Gen Z has been able to spot sales pitches fairly easily and disregard flashy advertising to be shallow and not relevant. Authenticity has been seen as a crucial factor to connect with brands; where there has been a real effort put in to understand the audience and what is relevant + interesting. Reality over aspiration, where information from the horse’s mouth holds the greatest value and not the shiny packaging it comes in.  According to research from Wundermann“They want to see their world in the ad world, they want it to be realistic. They don’t expect perfection. They don’t want to see a model with their hair blowing back in a cornfield, putting on mascara. They know that’s not true.”
Co-creation is the new User Generated Content:
Personalised interactions with brands allow Gen Z to create their own unique experiences. According to research conducted by Kantar Millward Brown Gen Z is characterized as heavy users of social platforms and oppose ‘homogeneous’ global advertising campaigns. They are much more attracted to ads that allow them to co-create or shape what happens, which is a contrast to Gens Y and X, who have a higher preference to links that have more information about the brand.
Channel preferences:
Even though Gen Z is seen to spend most of their time on digital platforms consuming data, they are also the generation that hates invasive ad formats the most. They are seen to be generally more open to outdoor and TV ads and have perfected the art of glossing over all digital advertisements that are thrown their way. Branded content is seen to be harder working than the dreaded skippable online ad formats where the art of storytelling earns it buck.
The importance of design:
Research from BD Network shows that Gen Z is known to be visual communicators, where they are best able to express their emotions through images. With a keen eye for design aesthetics, this generation is used to an on-demand world of infinite choices. They are seen to be extremely design conscious and look for brands that are able to reflect their own ‘unique’ personalities. They are quick to shut out brands that flaunt the obvious ‘stock imagery’ as not putting enough effort into its communication.
Privacy concerns to the fore:
Research by Wunderman revealed that Gen Z is the most conscious about the volumes of personal data that brands collect from them. This is the generation that expects a value exchange for what they are handing over to brands. Three out of 4 worry about information companies collect on them and are resigned to that being a necessary evil. However, this generation is savvy enough to know exactly what they want, and expect, from brands. Gen Z is saying ‘You’ve got my data. What are you going to do? Better make it efficient for me.’ For marketers, the key shift would be not about more transactions but about making those transactions easier.
As Millennials start to mature, Gen Z is the current crop of newly forming adult identities. With that comes new statements in style, tastes and trends. Of course, this also provides the legion of marketers and communications professionals a new cohort to focus their attention on.